WebRTC – a new web standard that lets you make audio and video calls from your browser (plugins not required) – is gaining traction. Web RTCstats research shows almost half (47%) of businesses surveyed are planning to use the technology within the next 12 months.

What’s the story?

Blame consumers, who these days expect instant personalised service. Coupled with the rising tide of online video – a report published by Cisco Visual predicts video will represent 69% of all consumer internet traffic by 2017 – and it’s not hard to see why WebRTC will pave the way for brands to show a friendly face when customers demand.

New possibilities for browsers

Like the name suggests, web browsers are a window to the online world, allowing browsers to sit back and take in the view. WebRTC changes all that, delivering consumers a ‘sit-forward’ experience that lets them talk to providers instantly.

  • A customer wants to know more about a product they’ve seen on a website. They click a button on the website to talk to a company product specialist. Later, the customer clicks another button to start a video call to watch a live product demonstration
  • You email a question to a work colleague. The answer is complex, and the recipient ponders a written response and thinks, too hard. So they click a link in your email signature to call your desk phone

Just two examples of new contact behaviours made possible by WebRTC.

WebRTC defined

WebRTC stands for Web Real-Time Communications. It’s an open standard for embedding real-time voice, video and data communications capabilities into web browsers and mobile applications.

WebRTC at work in contact centres and unified communications

  • Click-to-talk: Customer browses company website and clicks a button to talk to an agent
  • Customer to web agent: Customer uses a non-WebRTC channel (e.g. PSTN) to call a contact centre. Agent answers call in their browser, paving the way for unifying other channels and data
  • Web agent to customer: Salesperson calls customer from the company CRM system, without picking up a phone
  • Web customer to web agent: Customer browses company website and starts web chat with contact center agent. Customer decides to talk to agent and clicks voice or video button
  • Virtual DDI: Employee email signatures include a link to personal WebRTC-enabled web pages. Email recipient clicks link to initiate a call on the employee device (mobile, desk phone, PC), based on rules defined by the employee
  • Voice and video conferencing: Employee emails a unique URL to invitees. Invitees click URL to join conference via voice-only or video, from their browser

Benefits

WebRTC delivers wide ranging benefits. Suffice to say it is free, secure, interoperable, delivers great quality, adapts to network conditions, and supports rapid application development. Learn more here.

  • It’s free
  • Platform and device independence
  • Secure voice and video
  • Advanced voice and video quality
  • Reliable session establishment
  • Multiple media streams
  • Adaptive to network conditions
  • Interoperability with VoIP and video
  • Rapid application development

Architecture

For the technically minded, see here for more under the hood detail.

WebRTC supported browsers and platforms

Browser and platform support varies. However, things are picking up as WebRTC’s popularity rises. Currently supported browsers and platforms:

  • Google Chrome
  • Mozilla Firefox
  • Opera
  • Android
  • iOS
  • Microsoft Edge

Talk to us if you want to explore the value WebRTC can offer your business.

Author: Khurram Awan

Technical Lead at Pyrios and specialist in the design, build and integration of contact centre and unified communications systems and applications. Khurram holds a Master of Computer Science. Prior to working at Pyrios, he led the contact centre infrastructure, planning and implementation team at Mobilink, the largest telecom company in Pakistan with 35 million customers and serving 0.6 million calls per day in its three contact centres across the country. Connect with Khurram on LinkedIn.

WebRTC – a new web standard that lets you make audio and video calls from your browser (plugins not required) – is gaining traction. Web RTCstats research shows almost half (47%) of businesses surveyed are planning to use the technology within the next 12 months.

What’s the story?

Blame consumers, who these days expect instant personalised service. Coupled with the rising tide of online video – a report published by Cisco Visual predicts video will represent 69% of all consumer internet traffic by 2017 – and it’s not hard to see why WebRTC will pave the way for brands to show a friendly face when customers demand.

New possibilities for browsers

Like the name suggests, web browsers are a window to the online world, allowing browsers to sit back and take in the view. WebRTC changes all that, delivering consumers a ‘sit-forward’ experience that lets them talk to providers instantly.

  • A customer wants to know more about a product they’ve seen on a website. They click a button on the website to talk to a company product specialist. Later, the customer clicks another button to start a video call to watch a live product demonstration
  • You email a question to a work colleague. The answer is complex, and the recipient ponders a written response and thinks, too hard. So they click a link in your email signature to call your desk phone

Just two examples of new contact behaviours made possible by WebRTC.

WebRTC defined

WebRTC stands for Web Real-Time Communications. It’s an open standard for embedding real-time voice, video and data communications capabilities into web browsers and mobile applications.

WebRTC at work in contact centres and unified communications

  • Click-to-talk: Customer browses company website and clicks a button to talk to an agent
  • Customer to web agent: Customer uses a non-WebRTC channel (e.g. PSTN) to call a contact centre. Agent answers call in their browser, paving the way for unifying other channels and data
  • Web agent to customer: Salesperson calls customer from the company CRM system, without picking up a phone
  • Web customer to web agent: Customer browses company website and starts web chat with contact center agent. Customer decides to talk to agent and clicks voice or video button
  • Virtual DDI: Employee email signatures include a link to personal WebRTC-enabled web pages. Email recipient clicks link to initiate a call on the employee device (mobile, desk phone, PC), based on rules defined by the employee
  • Voice and video conferencing: Employee emails a unique URL to invitees. Invitees click URL to join conference via voice-only or video, from their browser

Benefits

WebRTC delivers wide ranging benefits. Suffice to say it is free, secure, interoperable, delivers great quality, adapts to network conditions, and supports rapid application development. Learn more here.

  • It’s free
  • Platform and device independence
  • Secure voice and video
  • Advanced voice and video quality
  • Reliable session establishment
  • Multiple media streams
  • Adaptive to network conditions
  • Interoperability with VoIP and video
  • Rapid application development

Architecture

For the technically minded, see here for more under the hood detail.

WebRTC supported browsers and platforms

Browser and platform support varies. However, things are picking up as WebRTC’s popularity rises. Currently supported browsers and platforms:

  • Google Chrome
  • Mozilla Firefox
  • Opera
  • Android
  • iOS
  • Microsoft Edge

Talk to us if you want to explore the value WebRTC can offer your business.

Author: Khurram Awan

Technical Lead at Pyrios and specialist in the design, build and integration of contact centre and unified communications systems and applications. Khurram holds a Master of Computer Science. Prior to working at Pyrios, he led the contact centre infrastructure, planning and implementation team at Mobilink, the largest telecom company in Pakistan with 35 million customers and serving 0.6 million calls per day in its three contact centres across the country. Connect with Khurram on LinkedIn.